Buxton

Buxton is a spa town in Derbyshire in the East Midlands region of England. It has the highest elevation – about 1,000 feet (300 m) above sea level – of any market town in England. Close to the county boundary with Cheshire to the west and Staffordshire to the south, Buxton is described as “the gateway to the Peak District National Park”

We decided to set out a little later today as the weather forecast suggested more thunder storms. So a tasty breakfast was made by Martin and Nick. It consisted of Oat Pancakes with fresh fruit and apricot and marmalade muffins. Delicious.

The journey to Buxton was so picturesque. Rolling hills and rocky outcrops made up the vast landscape. 40 minutes later we arrived and found somewhere to park close to town. As usual our first stop was at a small cafe with outside seating to enjoy a refreshing drink and snack. I had a chicken and thyme sausage roll with home made coleslaw, very nice.

Chicken and Thyme sausage roll.

Our tour guide again today was a multi geocache that led us on a tour of the town. We needed to visit most of the historical locations to gather some information.

Built on the River Wye and overlooked by Axe edge moor. Buxton has a history as a spa town due to its geothermal spring which rises at a constant temperature of 28 °C. The spring waters are piped to St Ann’s Well (a shrine to St.Anne since medieval times) at the foot of The Slopes, opposite the Crescent near the town centre. The well was declared to be one of the Seven Wonders of the Peak by philosopher Thomas Hobbes in his 1636 book De Mirabilibus Pecci: Being The Wonders of the Peak in Darby-shire.

St Ann’s Well. You can fill your bottles and drink straight from the Well. Pure Buxton Water.

Buxton landmarks include Poole’s Cavern, an extensive limestone cavern open to the public, and St Ann’s Well, fed by the geothermal spring bottled and sold internationally by Buxton Mineral Water Company. Also in the town is the Buxton Opera House which hosts several music and theatre festivals each year. The Devonshire Campus of the University of Derby is housed in one of the town’s historic buildings.

Buxton Opera House.
The Devonshire Dome, home to the University of Derby.

The Grade II listed fan window Below, was built in 1863 at Buxton Station is a well known landmark in the town, greeting rail passengers to and from their destination along the Buxton to Manchester line. Originally part of a twin railway terminus, it was restored and repaired in 2019 (following vandalism which broke glass panels) organised by the Friends of Buxton Station; the fan window is just one of many improvement projects which have slowly transformed Buxton Station since the volunteer group rejuvenated in 2015.

The fan window of Buxton station.
Pavilion Gardens
Reputed to be the oldest hotel in England.
With a rich history that dates back thousands of years, and includes some notable guests including Mary Queen of Scots herself. The Old Hall Hotel now stands as one of the spa town of Buxton’s most popular places to stay, nestled deep in the heart of the Peak District.

The Crescent (as photographed below) was the centrepiece of the Fifth Duke of Devonshire’s plans to establish a fashionable Georgian spa town in Buxton. The grade 1 listed building is one of the most architecturally significant buildings in the country. The redevelopment and restoration will secure a major investment of circa £50 million in Buxton and put the town back on the national and international map as England’s leading spa town. The project will create in excess of 140 permanent jobs, 350 construction related jobs and many more permanent jobs indirectly through new spa-related businesses resulting in a boost the local economy by over £4.5 million. The Crescent and Thermal Spa Experience and development of the Pump Room will also provide new indoor attraction for residents, visitors, groups and schools.

Plans for the Crescent include a  81-bedroom luxury spa hotel occupying the majority of the Crescent and which will incorporate the magnificent Assembly Rooms and a  thermal natural mineral water spa in the Natural Baths. The project will also feature 6 retail units in the front ground floor.

The project is estimated to cost over £46 million.

View from the slopes.
Buxton Town Hall.

The Met Office Climatological Station, located on The Slopes in Buxton, just above the War Memorial, has records of the Buxton climate, reaching back nearly 150 years. Records of Buxton weather originally began at the 1866 in the grounds of Devonshire Royal Hospital.

Buxton Climatological Station moved to the current site in 1925 and continues to provide data to various bodies. Michael Hilton (famed for this Buxton Weather website) and a group of dedicated volunteers currently maintain the station. The Station has records of temperatures, humidity, rainfall, and much more – and even details like the daily temperature of the soil, one metre (3 feet) below the ground.

After visiting these locations we had a walk through the Pavilion gardens. It really is beautiful, but best of all a river running through the middle. The stream is brown in colour, but clear due to the amount of iron in the water. The water looked so inviting and the children were having so much fun, so you guessed it, Suzy went in followed by myself and Martin. Perfectly refreshing for a day like today.

Having to retrieve the very over excited Suzy to move on to our next location.

A few more caches and it was time to leave this historic town. We wanted to stop at a road side cafe we had seen on the journey in. It overlooked the peaks and you could see for miles. Just in the time as they were just about to close. Fortunately they could provide take away cups so we could take our time. We also purchased some Stilton pork pies, I shall let you know what those were like later.

Tea drunk, photos taken, Homewood bound. Ben is cooking tonight, coached by Nick. We are all looking forward to our home made burgers and potato wedges.

Incoming storm.

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